Climate Savers Computing – About – Frequently Asked Questions












About Us


Notice: Use of undefined constant lang – assumed ‘lang’ in /var/www/www.climatesaverscomputing.org/html/modules/mod_breadcrumbs/tmpl/default.php on line 6

Notice: Use of undefined constant lang – assumed ‘lang’ in /var/www/www.climatesaverscomputing.org/html/modules/mod_breadcrumbs/tmpl/default.php on line 18
Home About


Frequently Asked Questions

Who can participate in the Initiative? How?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative brings together:

  • Consumers, who are encouraged to participate by using power-management capabilities on their PCs and by choosing systems that meet or exceed the latest ENERGY STAR specification for any future PC purchases.
  • Computer and component manufacturers, who commit to developing products that meet or exceed the latest ENERGY STAR specification.
  • System Buyers, who commit to choosing systems that meet or exceed the latest ENERGY STAR specification for a majority of their PC and volume server2 computer purchases, and to using power-management tools on PCs. System Buyers include any organizations that buy PCs and/or servers, including corporations, government institutions, universities and energy companies.
  • Environmental and consumer organizations, who commit to educating end users about the benefits of energy-efficient computers and power-management tools for home use.

Back to top

What are the membership types?

Individuals are encouraged to support the Initiative by pledging to use power management, and to make high-efficiency systems a requirement for their next computer purchase. Organizations can participate as one of two member types:

  • Associate membership is available for companies wanting to play an integral role in the efforts of the organization. Associate Member dues are $2,500 annually. For more details, please review the Associate member agreement.
  • Affiliate members are organizations that agree to purchase computers that meet or exceed the latest ENERGY STAR specification. Affiliate membership is free and open to any type of organization. For more details, please review the Affiliate member agreement.

In addition to Associates and Affiliates, the Initiative has Sponsors and a Board of Directors. Sponsor and Board-level membership is by invitation only. For more information, contact [email protected].

Back to top

What are the tech specs of the Initiative?

The Initiative starts with the current U.S. ENERGY STAR specification for desktops, laptops and workstation computers—including monitors—and gradually increases the efficiency requirements over ensuing years. The ENERGY STAR specification, which took effect in July 2009, requires power supplies to be at least 85% efficient at 50% of rated output and 82% at 20% and 100% of rated output. The specification also stipulates allowed system typical energy consumption (TEC), where TEC is the typical annual energy use, measured in kilowatt-hours using measurements of average operational mode power levels scaled by an assumed typical usage model (duty cycle) . Desktop and notebook computer systems have different TEC criteria depending on the systems’ feature sets (i.e. discrete graphics, number of cores, and memory). ENERGY STAR also requires that systems be shipped with power-management features enabled.

In addition to efficiency specifications, the Initiative asks companies to utilize advanced power management features such as the low power S3 or “sleep” mode settings on all PCs (desktops, workstations, notebooks, etc.) and to adopt the Initiative’s recommended power management policy. This policy sets for PCs to turn off the display and hard drive after 15 minutes of inactivity, and put the system into “sleep” mode after 30 minutes of inactivity. The computer is reactivated or “wakes up” when the mouse or keyboard are touched.

Climate Savers Computing requirements for systems with multi output power supplies. These systems typically include PCs, thin clients, and workstations:

  1. Climate Savers Computing Bronze: ENERGY STAR 5.0 qualified PLUS an 85% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 82% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output).
  2. Climate Savers Computing Silver: ENERGY STAR 5.0 qualified PLUS an 88% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 85% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output).
  3. Climate Savers Computing Gold: ENERGY STAR 5.0 qualified PLUS a 90% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 87% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output)
Climate Savers Computing requirements for systems with single output power supplies. These systems are typically volume servers including 1S, 2S, 4S and blade servers:
  1. Climate Savers Computing Bronze: Volume servers must have 85% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 81% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output), and a power factor of at least 0.9 at 100% of rated output.
  2. Climate Savers Computing Silver: Volume servers must have 89% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 85% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output).
  3. Climate Savers Computing Gold: Volume servers must have 92% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 88% minimum efficiency at 20% and 100% of rated output).
  4. Climate Savers Computing Platinum: Volume servers must have 94% minimum efficiency rating for the PSU at 50% of rated output (and 90% minimum efficiency at 20% of rated output and 90% minimum efficiency at 100% of rated output).

Back to top

How are members expected to apply the Initiative’s technical specifications?

By joining the Initiative, our members commit to specifying systems that meet or exceed the latest ENERGY STAR specification for a majority of their corporate personal computer and volume server  computer purchases. The tables below lists the minimum percentage of total procurements requested from Climate Savers Computing Initiative participants at each efficiency level in a given year.

 

Minimum PC efficiency targets and purchase commitment level
Year 1: July ’07 – June ’08 Year 2: July ’08 – June ’09 Year 3: July ’09 – June ’10 Year 4: July ’10 – June ’11
Base PC (most recent version of ENERGY STAR PC specification) 100% 100% 100% 100%
Bronze PC (85% PSU)   >=20% >=80% 100%
Silver PC (88% PSU)     >=20% >=80%
Gold PC (90% PSU)       >=20%

 

Volume-server minimum efficiency targets and purchase-commitment levels*

  Year 1: July 07 – June 08 Year 2: July ’08 – June ’09 Year 3: July ’09 – June ’10 Year 4: July ’10 – June ’11
Bronze Server (85% PSU or most recent version of ENERGY STAR server spec (when available)) >=20% >=80% >=80% 100%
Silver Server (89% PSU)   >=20% >=40% 100%
Gold Server (92% PSU)       >=20%

*Specifications are for volume servers that are 1S, 2S, 4S and blade servers.

 

Find out more about the technical specifications of the Initiative at /about/tech-specs/

Back to top

How do I find a Climate Savers Computing-compatible PC or server?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative offers an online product catalog containing energy-efficient PCs, laptops, servers, power supplies and power management software.

Back to top

Which products are included in the Climate Savers Computing product catalog?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative online catalog is a resource for individuals and companies to find products that comply with the Initiative. The catalog includes desktop PCs, laptops, servers and power supplies that meet the Initiative’s technical specifications, including power management software. Additional products in the catalog categorized under “Other” are complementary energy efficient products that closely align to the organization’s purpose.

Back to top

How does the Climate Savers Computing Initiative work with ENERGY STAR?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative recently announced a partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ENERGY STAR program to accelerate the adoption of energy-saving technology and practices. Under the terms of the agreement, ENERGY STAR becomes the Climate Savers Computing Initiative’s baseline technical recommendation now and in the future, and the Initiative will provide technical input into future ENERGY STAR specifications. By recommending systems that have earned the ENERGY STAR, the Climate Savers Computing Initiative is making it easier for its members to identify and choose energy-efficient systems.

Back to top

What are the details of the ENERGY STAR 5.0 specification?

Visit the ENERGY STAR website for a detailed description of the specification.

Back to top

How does the Climate Savers Computing Initiative work with 80+?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative and 80+ are both programs that promote the development and purchase of energy efficient power supplies for use in desktop, laptop, thin client, and work station computers as well as servers.  Both CSCI and 80+ use the same naming conventions for labeling efficient power supply categories as well as efficiency requirements for each of the categories.  These labels are base, bronze, silver and gold.  80 PLUS is an innovative, electric utility-funded incentive program to integrate more energy-efficient power supplies into desktop computers and servers.  Find out more about 80+ at their website http://www.80plus.org/

Back to top

How much energy do computers really waste?

In a typical desktop PC, nearly half the power coming out of the wall is wasted and never reaches the processor, memory, disks or other components.

In offices, homes and data centers, the added heat from inefficient computers can increase the demand on air conditioners and cooling systems, making the computing equipment even more expensive to run. Servers are typically more efficient than desktops, but still waste 30–40% of the input power. With proven technology that actually saves money in the long run, the vast majority of these energy losses can be eliminated.

In addition, there is a significant opportunity to reduce overall energy consumption by putting systems into a lower power-consuming state when they are inactive for long periods of time. Even though most of today’s desktop PCs are capable of automatically transitioning to a sleep or hibernate state when inactive, about 90% of systems have this functionality disabled.

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative promotes efforts to increase the use and effectiveness of power-management features by educating computer users on the benefits of these tools and by working with software vendors and IT departments to implement best practices. For a typical business desktop user, implementing advanced power-management policies alone—without compromising productivity—could save 60% of the electricity consumed.

Back to top

If computers waste 50% of the power they draw from the wall, what happens to the wasted power?

The wasted power is expended as heat, which means that on top of the cost of running the computer, you may also be spending more on air conditioning to cool your home or office.

Back to top

Do you have any plans to extend the Climate Savers Computing Initiative to other components/products?

The Initiative’s product scope is purposely narrow to ensure focus, impact and progress to our goals. The organization has been asked by a number of stakeholders to address other product sets as well. There is a high level of leverage in the work done in the computing space to other product domains which may result in future roadmaps that include products sets beyond computing today. While none are currently in scope at this time, consideration is given in order to incorporate where and when necessary.

Back to top

Does Climate Savers Computing Initiative have a member requirement for monitors?

Climate Savers Computing Initiative does not have a member purchasing requirement for computer monitors. However, CSCI strongly encourages members to purchase Energy Star qualified monitors.Visit www.energystar.gov to find a complete list of Energy Star qualified monitors. Energy Star rated monitors can use 25-60% less electricity than standard models. In addition, enabling the monitor’s power management features and turning it off during periods of extended inactivity reduce computing energy consumption and subsequent global warming gases. Typical power management products enable monitor power management. By purchasing Energy Star rated monitors, enabling power management and turning monitors off at night, users may realize on average 100-500 kWh per year in energy savings.To determine potential energy savings from purchasing an Energy Star monitor, check the Savings Calculator at the Energy Star website. Purchasing an energy-efficient monitor and enabling power management will also lead to additional energy savings on room air conditioning and maintenance.

Back to top

How do you protect the privacy of individuals who sign up for the program?

All individual member information gathered by Climate Savers Computing Initiative is treated as confidential and will not shared with other companies. The Initiative will not utilize member information other than for pre-agreed upon Initiative communication. Further, individual members will not be listed by name on the Initiative web site. Review our privacy policy.

Back to top

How do I set the power management settings on my computer? Are you going to develop a tool for this?

For instructions on how to enable power management on your computer, please visit here. Currently CSCI does not have plans to develop a tool to assist users with power management features.  However we are planning an IT Power Management Summit in March to address enterprise power management issues.  In addition, computer users should visit the EPA’s Power Management site http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=power_mgt.pr_power_management to learn more about activating power management.

Back to top

How can I learn more about the joint EPA/CSCI IT Power Management Summit?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative and the EPA hosted an enterprise power management webinar on March 30, 2009. The webinar, entitled “IT Power Management Summit,” looked at enterprise IT needs, obstacles and opportunities around the issue of power management. The session included a first look at new Forrester Research data on PC power management practices within enterprise IT. Additionally, the webinar addressed:

  • Opportunities to eliminate energy waste and save money/carbon
  • Implementation obstacles and how to overcome them
  • Best practices from companies who have already successfully implemented power management

You can find a video recording and additional resources from the webinar
here.



Back to top

It is true that power management doesn’t work with networked computers?

On some systems, sleep mode can interfere with certain network settings. This is most applicable in environments with older systems that need to stay continuously connected so the network administrator can “push” administrative software updates to the individual computers. You can find more information about this situation on the EPA’s ENERGY STAR web site at http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=power_mgt.pr_power_mgt_sleep_activate, including tips and technologies for successfully using power management in networked environments.

Back to top

Are you available to speak/participate at an event?

We welcome speakership/event opportunities. Please forward the following information to events (at) climatesaverscomputing.org:

  • When and where is the event?
  • When do you need a commitment by?
  • What would the representative from Climate Savers be speaking about?
  • Are there any specific speaker requirements (title, company type, etc.)?
  • How many people do you expect at the event?
  • Where is this event held?
  • What other companies will be represented at the event?

Back to top

How can I contact individual Climate Savers Computing Initiative member companies?

You can contact the Climate Savers Computing Initiative at contact (at) climatesaverscomputing.org. We can forward inquiries to individual member companies, but we can not guarantee that you will receive a response.

Back to top

How does this program differ from World Wildlife Fund’s Climate Savers Initiative?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative was started in the spirit of WWF’s Climate Savers program, which mobilizes leading companies to cut carbon dioxide emissions. In partnership with WWF, companies commit to absolute, measurable greenhouse gas reduction targets. By 2010, Climate Savers companies will reduce their carbon dioxide pollution by over ten million tons each year, the equivalent of taking 2 million cars off the road. The Climate Savers Computing Initiative is an extension of WWF’s model and seeks to increase the energy efficiency of IT equipment, by challenging IT equipment manufacturers to develop and sell products with higher energy efficiency, and to encourage IT users to buy those products. We aim to reduce 54 million tons of carbon by 2010.

Back to top

Do you have plans to expand the Initiative to include e-waste, manufacturing and other aspects of the computing industry that impact the environment?

As our name implies, we chose to focus on energy waste and the resulting emissions contributing to climate change as one of the most pressing environmental issues of our era.

The average desktop PC wastes almost half the power it consumes, as heat, and the average server wastes about 30 percent of its consumed power. In achieving the ambitious goals set out, we will have gone a long way towards driving these inefficiencies out of the IT market.

While none are currently in scope at this time, consideration is given in order to incorporate where and when necessary. The organization partners with other organizations that cover other IT topics and can refer them as necessary.

Back to top

What is the new Climate Savers Computing naming scheme and why is this being introduced?

Climate Savers Computing is introducing a naming scheme to make it easier to identify products that meet the Initiative’s program criteria. The naming scheme does not change the program criteria; it simply provides an easier way to refer to products that meet or exceed a particular level of efficiency. The naming scheme for desktop PCs, laptops and workstations is outlined below:

  1. Climate Savers Computing Bronze PC: Systems that meet Energy Star 5.0 Client Computer Specification with an 85 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 82 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output).
  2. Climate Savers Computing Silver PC: Systems that meet Energy Star 5.0 Client Computer Specification with an 88 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 85 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output).
  3. Climate Savers Computing Gold PC: Systems that meet Energy Star 5.0 Client Computer Specification with a 90 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 87 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output).

In addition, the Initiative sets the following high-efficiency targets for volume servers (1U/2U single- and dual-socket servers, four socket and blade servers):

  1. Climate Savers Computing Bronze Server: Volume servers that meet Energy Star Tier 1 Server Specification with an 85 percent minimum efficiency for the power supply unit (PSU) at 50 percent of rated output (and 81 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output), and power factor of at least 0.9 at 100 percent of rated output.
  2. Climate Savers Computing Silver Server: Volume servers that meet Energy Star Tier 1 Server Specification with an 89 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 85 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output).
  3. Climate Savers Computing Gold Server: Volume servers that meet Energy Star Tier 1 Server Specification with a 92 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 88 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent and 100 percent of rated output.
  4. Climate Savers Computing Platinum Server: Volume servers that meet Energy Star Tier 1 Server Specification with a 94 percent minimum efficiency for the PSU at 50 percent of rated output (and 90 percent minimum efficiency at 20 percent of rated output and 91 percent minimum efficiency at 100 percent of rated output.

Back to top

Does Climate Savers Computing Initiative now include four socket and blade servers in their volume server specifications?

Yes, Climate Savers Computing includes four socket and blade servers in their volume server specifications.  4S and blade servers are a growing segment of enterprise server purchases.  We believe that by focusing on power savings for all volume server segments, we can begin to reduce computer energy consumption and the subsequent release of global warming gas emissions.

Back to top

2010 Progress Report

Background: In 2010, the Climate Savers Computing Initiative (CSCI) commissioned research to see if the IT industry was on track to achieve its reduction goal of 54 million metric tons by July 2011.

What is the significance of this research, and what does it show?

The study shows that CSCI’s efforts have helped accelerate the reduction of worldwide CO2 emissions that result from computing. The IT sector successfully reduced annual CO2 emissions by somewhere between 32 million and 36 million metric tons. This reduction was achieved, in part, by CSCI’s efforts to drive increased development and adoption of higher efficiency equipment and power management.

This achievement means that the IT industry has made significant progress and is well on its way (60 to 70 percent) to reaching CSCI’s goal of reducing annual CO2 emissions by 54 million metric tons by July 2011.

Back to top

How did CSCI establish its original goal of 54 million metric tons of CO2?

In 2007, the energy consumed by computing represented 2 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions each year — and it has been growing since. When the Climate Savers Computing Initiative was established in July of that year, the organization looked at the efficiency levels of average PC equipment in the marketplace. The organization reviewed the potential of new, higher efficiency equipment and established criteria for measuring increased energy savings, year over year, through June 2011. To establish a goal, CSCI compared the projected number of workstation, laptop, and server shipments (provided by International Data Corporation) to the forecasted use and deployment of power management, based on CSCI’s criteria for effective PC settings. As originally developed, this goal will be achieved exclusively through desktop infrastructure (desktop PCs and laptops), server efficiencies, and client power management deployment.

Back to top

What does this report represent regarding CSCI’s role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions through power management and energy efficient hardware adoption?

The mission of the Climate Savers Computing Initiative is to increase the adoption of power management and the development and adoption of energy efficient computing equipment. We are not taking credit for single-handedly achieving these emissions results. However, based on our market research and surveys of our membership, more than 60 percent of CSCI’s members have increased their adoption of power management while driving broader adoption in the larger market through education and engagement efforts. In addition, CSCI’s members have increased their adoption of higher efficiency equipment. Our members have a 40 percent higher adoption rate of the most energy efficient computing equipment than the market as a whole.

In addition to strides made by CSCI’s membership, the organization has played a key role in bringing buyers and suppliers together to create a demand for more efficient solutions. When CSCI was established in 2007, desktop computers wasted 50 percent of the power that came from the wall. Today, through the efforts of our organization, hardware manufacturers, large IT buyers, and other key partners, we’ve cut that waste by at least 25 percent for new systems. As a result, just one year after the organization was established, the number of products meeting CSCI’s technical criteria had jumped from zero to several hundred.

Back to top

Explain how the data was uncovered for this study.

The data for this research report was gathered and analyzed by Natural Logic, an independent, third-party research firm with experience developing sustainability models that reduce energy consumption. The research firm calculated the 32 million to 36 million metric tons estimate by measuring the amount of CO2 emissions offset by the adoption of power management and high efficiency equipment since 2007, and comparing it to projected emissions for “business as usual.” Business as usual represents the projected amount of CO2 emitted by IT equipment if shipments of energy efficient equipment continued at their 2007 rates.

Natural Logic designed the methodology for this research analysis and reviewed the potential pathways to achieving a reduction goal of 54 million tons. The data was compiled by looking at member company progress on power management adoption and market data (shipment and installed base information, PSU efficiency levels, number of units sold worldwide, operating systems in use, market research, and estimates developed through interviews with industry analysts, including Forrester Research and 451 Group).

Back to top

Explain the timeline that the data represent.

This research study covers the first three program years of the Climate Savers Computing Initiative, July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2010. In its current form, the report includes projected data for shipments of higher efficiency computing equipment in the first half of 2010.

Back to top

How was the data validated, and what organizations did you work with on the study?

The data and the analysis of this study have been validated by Natural Logic with additional review performed by several independent third parties.

Back to top

Expansion into Networking

Background: The Climate Savers Computing Initiative (CSCI) is expanding its focus to include the development, deployment, and adoption of energy efficient networking equipment and systems.

Why did the Climate Savers Computing Initiative identify networking as the right sector for its expansion?

Together with our partners and key stakeholders, the Climate Savers Computing Initiative (CSCI) initiated extensive research that revealed we could apply our competencies to commercial and home networking to create a significant impact toward reducing global IT energy consumption.

Back to top

What do you expect to achieve by expanding the organization to include commercial and home networking?

Based on our research, the Climate Savers Computing Initiative estimates that the global IT industry can offset 38 million metric tons of annual CO2 emissions by 2015 through the development and deployment of more energy efficient networking equipment worldwide. This is the equivalent of $5 billion in energy cost savings for businesses and consumers.

By applying the same competencies CSCI has driven in the computing space, we can achieve significant reductions in energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Our expansion is designed to drive global standards that will provide enhanced design, delivery, and adoption of high efficiency products in the networking sector.

Back to top

What kinds of devices and networking systems are included in the expansion?

We will focus resources, abilities, and expertise on energy efficient products and practices to support the digital age. We are including both commercial and consumer networking equipment, with an initial focus on networking devices used by enterprise and telecoms, followed by home network equipment. Practices will include consumer and commercial awareness and adoption of higher efficiency equipment standards, technology, and best practices.

As a secondary phase, CSCI intends to further focus on the way networks communicate with connected devices in home and business environments.

Back to top

Why expand into a sector that accounts for such a small fraction of commercial and residential buildings’ CO2 emissions?

A study conducted by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) concluded that networking equipment used 1 percent of commercial and residential buildings’ electricity in 2008. While that may not seem like a significant number, it accounted for a huge amount of energy consumption and spending in the United States that year, to the tune of 18 billion KWh and approximately $2 billion.

Back to top

Why is now the right time to focus on networking energy efficiency?

As the number of networked devices continues to rise among consumers and enterprises, the demand on networks and networking equipment will increase in step. According to a study released by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the impact of networking on greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption in commercial and residential buildings is expected to grow by approximately 6 percent annually without a focused effort to improve their energy efficiency. By addressing and reducing the environmental and economic impact of networking, CSCI intends to help enterprises and consumers avoid increases in CO2 emissions and energy costs associated with IT in the coming years.

Back to top

Who are the leaders behind this expansion?

The Climate Savers Computing Initiative’s Board of Directors made the decision to expand into networking systems as part of its renewed commitment to further reduce our industry’s energy consumption, costs, and environmental footprint. We have strong leadership in this endeavor from new members Cisco, Emerson Network Power, and Juniper Networks, as well as our existing board members CSC, Google Inc., HP, Intel, Microsoft, and the World Wildlife Fund.

Back to top

How will you recruit new members and drive energy efficiency in this new arena?

Three top-tier networking manufacturers — Cisco, Emerson Network Power, and Juniper Networks — now join the Board of Directors to work collaboratively with the existing leadership to accelerate the shift toward increased energy efficiency in the networking sector. CSCI will drive the development of criteria, technology, and best practices in networking to facilitate significant energy, cost, and emissions savings.

Back to top

What progress have you made toward achieving the greenhouse gas reduction goals initially set by the organization in 2007?

CSCI is making progress toward our goal to reduce the industry’s annual greenhouse gas emissions by 54 million metric tons by July 2011. We expect to achieve this goal by increasing the adoption of power management and higher efficiency equipment. CSCI will continue to focus on improving computer efficiency and reducing the barriers to power management adoption among enterprises and consumers.

To learn more about the IT sector’s progress in reducing carbon emissions since 2007, check out the fact sheet and FAQ for our recent emissions research.

Back to top

Are you including greenhouse gas reductions from networking systems in that original reduction goal?

No. The CO2 reductions accomplished from expanding into networking systems will not be factored into the original reduction goal of 54 million metric tons. As originally developed, this goal will be achieved exclusively through desktop infrastructure (desktop PCs and laptops), server efficiencies, and power management deployment.

To track the progress of our expansion, Climate Savers Computing has developed a new emissions reduction goal related to the development and deployment of high efficiency networking equipment. That new goal is to offset 38 million metric tons of annual CO2 emissions by 2015.

Back to top

How does the expansion impact your focus on the initial goal?

While significant in terms of our potential to reduce energy consumption, the expansion into networking will not change our overall mission and goals as an organization. We will remain committed to raising awareness and increasing development and adoption of high efficiency technologies and power management, with the added inclusion of networking equipment and the infrastructure that allows networks to keep us connected.

Back to top

Footnotes

  1. Rocky Mountain Institute, “Cool Citizens: Everyday Solutions to Climate Change
  2. The Initiative recommends servers with an 85 percent efficient power supply unit (PSU), or that meet most recent version of ENERGY STAR server spec, when it becomes available.





Did you know?

“By 2010, about half of the Forbes Global 2000 companies will spend more on energy than on computing hardware such as PCs and servers.”5